The nation’s strictest immigration law has resurrected ugly images from Alabama’s days as the battleground state for civil rights.

Sharing a border with Mexico and being flooded with boycotts does not make Arizona the poster state for the challenges of immigration laws in the United States. The four states that followed suit with their own immigration law enforcement aren’t either.

No, the case that’s likely to be the first sorted out by the U.S. Supreme Court comes from the Deep South state of Alabama, and Alabama’s jump to the forefront says as much about the country’s evolving demographics as it does the nation’s collective memory of the state’s sometimes violent path to desegregation.

Its stature as the strictest in the U.S., along with the inevitable comparisons of today’s Hispanics with African-Americans of the 1950s and `60s, makes it a near certainty the law will be a test case for the high court.