Climate change has become a more polarizing issue during President Obama’s time in the White House.
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The divide between advocates and skeptics over whether to do something about climate change is widening, with both sides growing more certain of their convictions.

A report this week from the United Nations warning of dire consequences from greenhouse gas emissions made headlines around the world and spurred calls for action from environmental groups.

But the report landed with a thud in Washington, where both Democrats and Republicans clung more tightly to their positions about the prudent policy response to climate science.

“I would have been shocked if this would have caused anybody to change what they thought,” said Andy Dessler, a professor of atmospheric science at Texas A&M University. “If people are persuaded by evidence, they would have been persuaded long ago.”

Experts and lawmakers broadly agree that climate change has become a more polarizing issue during President Obama’s time in the White House.