It’s all about trying to pay for it…..

The majority of controversial issues involving the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have stemmed from its mandate that all people have health insurance or else face a fine (or is it a tax?) and ACA’s transformation of the U.S. health insurance system from a largely private marketplace to a government-manipulated, exchange-based market. While both of these issues are tremendously important, one of the most damaging Obamacare provisions – the expansion of Medicaid – has largely gone unnoticed by the general public.

Despite the lack of attention the issue is getting, the growing Medicaid population could lead to state government meltdowns around the country and a national health care crisis for which most Americans are completely unprepared.

The majority of controversial issues involving the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have stemmed from its mandate that all people have health insurance or else face a fine (or is it a tax?) and ACA’s transformation of the U.S. health insurance system from a largely private marketplace to a government-manipulated, exchange-based market. While both of these issues are tremendously important, one of the most damaging Obamacare provisions – the expansion of Medicaid – has largely gone unnoticed by the general public.

Despite the lack of attention the issue is getting, the growing Medicaid population could lead to state government meltdowns around the country and a national health care crisis for which most Americans are completely unprepared.

One of Obamacare’s chief initiatives is providing for the expansion of Medicaid. The legislators who wrote ACA understood taxpayer subsidies alone would not be enough to cover the roughly 30 million Americans who did not have health insurance at the time of the law’s passage, so they created a provision in Obamacare that incentivizes states to expand Medicaid programs by offering to pay 100 percent of the cost from 2014 through 2016. The law requires the national government to gradually reduce its share down to 90 percent by 2020. The remaining 10 percent of costs will be covered by the states.