And who and why was this video released to stir up trouble with those looking for a cause to riot?

Protesters largely honored calls for restraint Tuesday after the release of a dash-cam video showing a a white Chicago police officer shooting and killing a black teenager, with few arrests reported and only brief disruptions to city traffic.

City officials and community leaders had long braced for the footage of the death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald at the hands of Officer Jason Van Dyke, who was charged with murder earlier Tuesday. They feared the kind of turmoil that occurred in cities such as Baltimore and Ferguson, Missouri, after young black men were slain by police or died in police custody.

Shortly after the video’s release, protesters began marching through city streets. Several hundred people blocked traffic on the near West Side. Some circled police cars in an intersection and chanted “16 shots.”

Demonstrators, at times numbering in the hundreds, streamed through streets in the downtown and near South Side areas, gathering at one point outside the police department’s District 1 headquarters.

Later, along Michigan Avenue, at least one person was detained, which led to a tense moment as protesters tried to prevent police from taking him away. Some threw plastic water bottles at officers and sat behind a police vehicle, refusing to move. Officers pulled them away, and the vehicle sped off. The Chicago Tribune reported that at least three people were detained by police, while one officer was taken to an ambulance with minor injuries.

The biggest group had mostly dissipated by 11 p.m., with a few dozen returning to the District 1 building. Another group of at least 50 people briefly blocked a busy expressway before walking toward a lakefront park.

Among the protesters was Justin Taylor, an 18-year-old University of Iowa student who returned home to Chicago for Thanksgiving.

“It’s powerful we’re coming together,” Taylor said. “Things like this happen too often.”

Protest groups are expected to stage more demonstrations in the days ahead, including one at City Hall scheduled for Wednesday and another seeking to block Michigan Avenue during Friday’s holiday shopping bonanza.