Without ever intending to, newly-elected Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has saved the United States from the worry of 10,000 unvetted Syrian “refugees” being flown into Canada by the year’s end, from flooding over America’s unsecured northern border.

Ditto for the 15,000 Trudeau is bringing to Canadian soil in February.

What happens in Canada stays in Canada as far as Montana ranchers and farmers are concerned.

..”In Montana, which shares a 500-mile (800-km) border with Canada, border agents and some residents say they are concerned about Ottawa’s plan to bring in 25,000 Syrians by year-end, even though the government there insists its screening will be thorough and there are limited indications that militants may be seeking to use refugee status to cross borders.

The world’s longest shared land border attracts a fraction of the U.S. attention and security resources taken up by the much shorter southern border with Mexico, which is patrolled by 18,000 U.S. border agents compared to 2,200 in the north.” (Reuters, Nov. 25, 2015)

In short, Trudeau nicknamed ‘Prime Minister Fluff’ by many detractors not part of the 39% who voted him in, may con Canadians that screening of the “refugees” he’s bringing in before the year’s end is “thorough”, but not down-to-earth Montana ranchers who live and work within feet of the longest international border on earth.

While mainstream media attention is on America’s southern border, there are zero border posts, checkpoints, or any other visible signs of security—other than watchful ranchers and farmers—along the 500-mile-long American northern border.

The rhetoric of politicians like Barack Obama and Justin Trudeau are cold comfort to the the roughly 100 ranchers who span Montana’s border with Canada.

The ranchers don’t have to see what’s going on with the influx of illegals on the boob tube, they see what’s happening by dint of holding front row seats to the movement of illegals over the unprotected northern border, with their only separation being miles of prairie grass.

The ranchers and farmers—so good at their jobs because they have to be—are credited by U.S. Border Patrol agent Andrew Herdina, vice president of the National Border Patrol Council—the border patrol union—as being “our best asset”.

“Herdina says the most effective tool in tracking illegal border crossers is not the border agents or surveillance airplanes; it’s the roughly 100 ranchers who span Montana’s border with Canada.” (Reuters)

“Last year, one rancher called the border patrol to report two strangers on his land, Herdina said. They were two Guatemalans who had crossed the border illegally.