On an isolated ranch 10 miles from the Mexican border in southern Arizona, Tangye Beckham worries about what the night will bring. That’s usually when her family’s 100-acre ranch begins to crawl with drug and immigrant traffickers from Mexico heading north into the United States.

“They’re belligerent, they carry weapons,” she said. “It’s a nightly problem with them being on the property. They’ve already tried to break in.”

Recently, as she was closing one of her gates in the pre-dawn hours, Beckham found herself surrounded by a group of illegal immigrants and feared being attacked. By running to her car, she said, she was able to get away, badly shaken.